Teachers with dyslexia: conquering challenges with compensatory strategies: Undergraduate dissertation for the BA (Hons) Childhood Studies at University of East Anglia

Teachers with dyslexia: conquering challenges with compensatory strategies: Undergraduate dissertation for the BA (Hons) Childhood Studies at University of East Anglia
ASIN
B01L2CA7IO
Published:
August 25th 2016
Goodreads Rating:
5.00
Pages:
145
Language
Genre:

This is a publication of my undergraduate dissertation for the BA (Hons) Childhood Studies studied at Norwich City College in association with the University of East Anglia. I achieved a grade of 88% for the dissertation and a first classification in the degree overall.

This dissertation delves into previous literature on teachers with dyslexia, which frequently recognises that this unique group of educators are deploying compensatory strategies in the classroom. It considers what these strategies are, why they have been developed and if these themes of resilience are found in other areas of teaching practice. The qualitative research was designed to reach the highly dispersed population of teachers with dyslexia through mediums such as an online-based questionnaire posted to popular teaching forums. The research consists of one semi-structured interview conducted with a trainee teacher to provide ‘rich’ data. The sample size of the participants is 11, all of whom are either qualified teachers or trainee teachers, who identify and have a diagnosis of dyslexia. The potential harm to participants who had not previously disclosed their dyslexia was avoided through anonymising any names or places discussed which could have potentially lead to their identification. Participants were made aware that they have a right to withdraw from the research at any time. The data offers an insight into the specific areas of difficulty teachers with dyslexia face and develop compensatory strategies for, both inside and outside of the classroom. Findings included: building support networks, empathising with pupils, reframing experiences of their own schooling, identifying their strengths to develop and adapt pedagogical approaches and not disclosing, or selectively disclosing dyslexia to training bodies and potential employers. The use of frequently practiced strategies of resilience can become so integrated in the practice of teachers with dyslexia, that methods developed to conquer challenges often become automatic and unrecognisable.